May 1968 the U.S.S. Scorpion Nuclear Submarine headed home from its mission in the
    Atlantic, but six days later failed to show up at its port in Norfolk, Virginia. A search
    consisting of over 36 ships and 8,000 men went under way, but to no avail, the sub was not
    found along with its 99 crew members.

    After weeks of searching the Navy officially declared the sub lost at sea. Almost a year and
    a half later the lost sub was found off the coast of the Azores, sitting at 2,000 feet below sea
    level. From the search craft used to locate the ship, some photos taken that many portions
    of the submarine were crushed by the deep ocean’s immense water pressure.

    The Navy conducted numerous studies on the possibilities of the submarine fate, but the
    final official conclusion stated that the U.S. Navy could not determine the cause of the
    sinking of the U.S.S. Scorpion. Since this time there have been many speculative ideas on
    what caused the nuclear sub to become lost. One theory is that there was a mechanical
    failure, another possibility was that one of its torpedoes exploded on-board and another
    idea was that it had a nuclear accident from its nuclear reactor. The most popular thought is
    that the submarine was actually torpedoed by the Soviet Union, in retaliation for its sub that
    was lost in March of 1968 in the Pacifi c, which the Soviets believed the Americans had
    torpedoed.

    As a result of the loss of the sub, Miami County lost one of its citizens, Kenneth Brocker,
    who was a Naval Machinist aboard the U.S.S. Scorpion when it went down.

    Recently we received a donation of one of his uniforms, complete with shirt, pants, and hat,
    along with a vast amount of historical news articles on the sinking of the U.S.S. Scorpion.

    If you would like to learn more about this subject there are numerous books published on
    the sinking of the submarine and the fate of its crew;

    “All Hands Down”, by Kenneth Sewell and Jerome Preisler; “Silent Steel:

    The Mysterious Death of the Nuclear Attack Sub USS Scorpion” by Stephen Johnson;

    “Blind Man’s Bluff : The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage” by Sherry Sontag
    and Christopher Drew;

    “Red Star Rogue: Th e Untold Story of a Soviet Submarine’s Nuclear Strike Attempt on the
    U.S.” by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond;

    “Scorpion Down: Sunk by the Soviets, Buried by the Pentagon: Th e Untold Story of the
    USS Scorpion” by Ed Offley.
Mysterious Sinking of U.S.S. Scorpion
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